Back to top

Beaming from Floor to Ceiling: Catherine Truman Architects

Use of exposed beams by Catherine Truman Architects

Exposed beams are the support system that every house needs: strong and firm, yet warm and inviting. Timber frames can transform the look and feel of any space, as they bring out the character in a home while emphasizing the building’s architecture and warming up the interior space. Whether you are trying to achieve a farmhouse flair look or a cozy cabin feel, Catherine Truman Architects has mastered the art of utilizing exposed beams to bring a feeling of authenticity and comfort to any home.New England Farmhouse by Catherine Truman ArchitectsNew England Farmhouse by Catherine Truman ArchitectsArchitecture by Catherine Truman Architects; photo by Nat Rea

An outdated farmhouse was transformed into a gorgeously rustic home by removing the dropped ceiling to expose the vaulted ceilings hiding underneath. Timbers were salvaged from a nearby barn on the property for reuse to help stabilize the structure and restore the home’s authentic New England feel.Rustic industrial loft renovation by Catherine Truman Architects Architecture by Catherine Truman Architects; photo by Jane Messinger

This industrial loft was renovated to create an open floor plan in a previously stuffy space. This reincarnation emits a down-to-earth, treehouse vibe with its exposed timber beams and spacious living area.Entertainment barn by Catherine Truman ArchitectsArchitecture by Catherine Truman Architects; photo by Jane Messinger

When presented with an old, 19th century barn, Catherine Truman Architects revamped the building to become a stunning and spacious family entertainment center, perfect for gatherings of all sizes. The wooden beams frame the entire barn and provide a sense of warmth and intimacy to this previously cavernous structure.Rustic living room by Catherine Truman ArchitectsArchitecture by Catherine Truman Architects; photo by Nat Rea

Catherine Truman Architects transformed this space into a soaring living room by removing the floor that once divided the two stories. The triangular wood beams present a larger-than-life look to the room, while also providing a cozy and charming vibe.

Top photo: Architecture by Catherine Truman Architects; photo by Jane Messinger

Category: 

Add new comment